Psychiatry Research Pathway

When compassion for those suffering from mental illness converges with a deep curiosity about the nature of the underlying problem, a passion for mental health research emerges. The specialized Psychiatry Research Pathway (PRP) enables residents to simultaneously receive clinical training and pursue their passion for research through mentorship, conducting research projects, and receiving training that facilitates their career development into highly successful investigators.

Advantages of Joining the PRP:

  • PRP residents are eligible to receive the David J. Kupfer Residency Research Fellowship for research activities, funds of up to $50,000 per recipient. 
  • An individualized mentor matching program is provided.
  • PRP residents can apply for a ten-week research elective during PGY2 (available to two residents annually).
  • PRP residents have flexibility in the afternoons during PGY2 to conduct research-related activities.
  • A minimum of 40% research time during PGY3, and a minimum of 60% research time during PGY4 is offered to residents in this program. PRP residents have no call during PGY3 and PGY4.
  • Travel fund awards are offered to support support and travel to scientific conferences and/or training courses in specialized methods.
  • Essential software packages, such as EndNote, SPSS, and SAS, are provided to PRP residents as needed.
  • Funding for research activities and salary supplements are available during the latter years of residency (and beyond as needed) to support the preparation of a K award application. These funds are awarded by the Department Chair.

Our PRP graduates have an exceptional record for receiving grants and being appointed to faculty. Read our resident biographies to learn how the PRP has helped past and current residents in their career development.


Interested in applying for the Psychiatry Research Pathway? Contact the PRP Director.

Resident looking through a microscope with his mentor
PRP Resident Gil Hoftman, MD, PhD with his research mentor, David Lewis, MD.