News Pictures

Hot Publication - Chung & Maisto

Time-varying associations between confidence and motivation to abstain from marijuana during treatment among adolescents
Chung T and Maisto SA
Addictive Behavior, 57:62-68, 2016

An important goal of addictions treatment is to develop a positive association between high levels of confidence and motivation to abstain from substance use.  Dr. Tammy Chung examined session-to-session changes in level of confidence and motivation to abstain from marijuana, and in the strength of the association between confidence and motivation to abstain.  Dr. Chung and her colleague, Dr. Stephen Maisto, modeled the time-varying association between confidence and motivation to abstain from marijuana use among youth in treatment, and the time-varying effect of pre-treatment covariates (marijuana abstinence goal and perceived peer marijuana use) on motivation to abstain.  

One hundred and fifty adolescents in community-based intensive outpatient treatment in Pennsylvania completed a pre-treatment assessment of abstinence goal, perceived peer marijuana use, and motivation and confidence to abstain from marijuana. Ratings of motivation and confidence to abstain also were collected after each session. A time-varying effect model (TVEM) was used to characterize changes in the association between confidence and motivation to abstain (lagged), and included covariates representing pre-treatment abstinence goal and perceived peer marijuana use.

The results of this study showed that confidence and motivation to abstain from marijuana generally increased during treatment. The association between confidence and motivation strengthened across sessions 1-4, and was maintained through later sessions. Pre-treatment abstinence goal had an early time-limited effect (through session 6) on motivation to abstain. Pre-treatment perception of peer marijuana use had a significant effect on motivation to abstain only at session 2.

Dr. Chung’s findings indicate that early treatment sessions represent a critical period during which the association between confidence and motivation to abstain generally increased. The time-limited effects of pre-treatment characteristics also suggest the importance of early sessions in addressing abstinence goal and peer substance use that may impact motivation to abstain from marijuana.

Contributors:
Tammy Chung, PhD (Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine)

Stephen A. Maisto, PhD (Department of Psychology, Syracuse University)

This article appears in the journal Addictive Behaviors.  To view the abstract, click here.